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Scurich Insurance Services has been serving the Monterey Bay Area since 1924. Our mission is to partner with our customers and provide them superior service and value. We are a member of United Valley Insurance Services, Inc., a cluster of over 70 California Independent Insurance agencies, which produced over $530,000,000 of annual premium last year. At Scurich Insurance Services we understand your business and our community. Our customers look to us for comprehensive solutions. We have established relationships with more than 40 of the nation’s leading insurance providers, which allows us to deliver multiple, competitively-priced options and a team of experts to guide you through the process. When you need to file a claim, change a policy or process a certificate you can depend on Scurich Insurance Services to respond quickly to your request. SERVICES In order to provide value added benefits to our customers that go beyond the insurance policy Scurich Insurance Services offers the following additional services: Safety Programs – English and Spanish OSHA Compliance Safety Policies – English and Spanish Online OSHA 300 Log Safety Posters and Payroll Stuffers - English and Spanish Certificates of Insurance – If received before 3:30pm done the same day Risk Management Consulting Brokerage Services Represent most major insurance companies to better market your account. Safety tapes/DVD’s BUSINESS LINES Commercial Commercial Packages Business Auto Workers Compensation Umbrella Bonds Directors & Officers Professional Liability Employment Practices Liability Personal Auto Home Umbrella Recreational Vehicles Boatss Life & Health Individual Medical Individual Life Group Medical Group Benefits

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Posts tagged with driver - driver

Are You Ready For A Car Crash?

Author TonyScurich , 11/2/2016
  safe-1142432_1920You know the drill after an auto crash, heart stopping panic, and then, especially if there’s major damage or a serious injury, exchanging names, addresses and insurance information with the other driver. Easy, right? However, if the other driver refuses to provide these particulars (or you’re so shaken that you forget to ask for them), you could end up in serious financial, or even legal, trouble. Dan Young, Senior Vice President of Insurance Relations for CARSTAR warns, “[After an accident] sometimes drivers just don't do what they’re supposed to do." To make sure you’re prepared for such a mishap, follow these guidelines:
  • Remain at the scene. Although state laws differ, failure to exchange information or notify police can lead to a hit-and-run charge or loss of your license.
  • Keep a “cheat sheet” in your glove compartment about what to ask after an accident.
  • Use your cellphone to take a photo of the other vehicle, (preferably showing its license plate) as visual proof of the incident.
  • Write down details. As soon as you and your vehicle are out of traffic and harm's way, record the date and time, location, make and model of the cars and actions or statements by the other driver.
  • Ask any bystanders or eyewitnesses for their names and contact information.
In the meantime, review your auto policy to make sure that you carry: 1) collision coverage, which will pay for repairing your car and providing a replacement vehicle, if needed and 2) uninsured/underinsured motorists insurance (UM/UIM), which will cover damages for injuries caused by an uninsured or underinsured driver. For more information, feel free to get in touch with our agency  

Avoid Sticker Shock For Your Teenage Driver

Author TonyScurich , 10/3/2016
Adding a teenager to your auto policy can raise your rate by more than 40%. The good news: you and your teen can reduce these hikes significantly in a variety of ways:
  1. Get good grades. Most insurance companies offer high school or college students with a B average or better a discount of up to 10%.
  2. Live away from home. Students at college or living at least 100 miles from their parents without a car can usually get a 5%-10% discount.
  3. Take an additional driving class. Although most insurance companies don’t give a discount for mandatory drivers’ed instruction, some companies will reduce premiums by 5% for teens who go to follow-up classes.
  4. Sign a parent-teen driving contract. Your insurer might offer up to a 5% discount if your teen agrees to follow such rules as not driving at night or with friends in the car.
  5. Raise your deductible. However, bear in mind that you’ll have to pay this deductible if your teen driver damages the car. If you repair every ding, you could spend a lot more than you'll save on premiums with a higher deductible.
  6. Reduce or drop some coverage. If you have an older car, you might not need Comprehensive or Collision insurance. Be wary of lowering Liability limits. In most cases, it makes sense to keep Personal Injury Protection (PIP) coverage, which pays medical expenses of anyone injured in an auto accident.
  7. Choose a safe vehicle. The higher the safety rating of your car, the lower your premiums – and the safer your teenager will be behind the wheel.
We’d be happy to help you minimize the sticker shock of adding a teen driver. Just give us a call.

NIOSH Offers Tips On Preventing Work-Related Highway Crashes

Author TonyScurich , 8/26/2016
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Employment-related accidents behind the wheel are the leading cause of death from traumatic injuries in the workplace, killing some 2,200 people a year and accounting for 22% of job-related fatalities. Deaths and injuries from these accidents increase costs and reduce productivity for employers - while bringing pain and suffering to family, friends, and coworkers.

Preventing work-related roadway crashes poses a significant risk management challenge. The roadway is a unique work environment. Compared with other work settings, employers have little ability to control conditions and exert direct supervision over their drivers. The volume of traffic and road construction continue to increase, while workers feel pressured to drive faster for longer periods, and often use mobile electronic devices that distract them behind the wheel.

To help reduce this risk, for both long-distance truck drivers and employees who occasionally use personal vehicles for company business, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends that employers follow these precautions:

  • Require drivers and passengers to use seat belts.
  • Ensure that employees who drive on the job have valid licenses.
  • Incorporate road fatigue management in safety programs.
  • Provide fleet vehicles with top quality crash protection.
  • Make sure employees receive training to operate specialized vehicles.
  • Offer periodic vision screening and physicals for employees whose primary job is driving.
  • Avoid requiring workers to drive irregular or extended hours.
  • Prohibit cell phone use and other distracting activities such as eating, drinking, or adjusting non-critical vehicle controls while driving.
  • Set schedules that allow drivers to obey speed limits.
  • Follow state laws on graduated driver's licensing and child labor.

For more information about how to prevent work-related driving deaths and injuries, just give one of our Risk Management experts a call at any time.


Car Insurance Deal-Breakers: Non-Renewal And Cancellation

Author TonyScurich , 7/25/2016

aquaplaning-83008_1280If your Auto insurance company sees you as a deadbeat or high-risk or driver, it might cancel or non-renew your policy.

Because insurers take cancellation seriously they won't eliminate coverage for a traffic ticket or two. What's more, state regulators ban cancellations under most circumstances. However, a company can non-renew your insurance at the end of each policy period (six to 12 months) or cancel the policy during the first 30 to 60 days that it's in force. The main reason for midterm cancellation is nonpayment. State regulators set the requirements, such as a written notice of non-payment, together with a 10 to 30-day grace period to pay. Some states allow insurers to cancel coverage, usually for an activity - such as a DUI conviction that involves bodily injury or substantial damage - which indicates you're at high risk for an accident; or for misrepresenting your driving history (for example, not disclosing that your teenager was behind the wheel instead of you when an accident occurred). Some companies will backdate coverage to the cancellation date, while others will not cover you during the period when you haven't paid your premiums. If you can't bring your account up to date or the company cancels you for a reason other than non-payment, your policy probably won't be renewed - which means you'll have to look for insurance elsewhere, probably at a higher rate. Depending on the reason for cancellation, some companies might refuse to write your business. In this case, you can to turn to the state's assigned-risk pool, which offers bare bones coverage at higher rates. Your best move is to do everything possible to avoid cancellation or non-renewal. For example, if you can't afford to premium payments, consider reducing your coverage rather than take the risk or cancellation. For more information, just give us a call. We're here to help!  

Auto Insurance: Saving $$ In Your Golden Years

Author TonyScurich , 5/2/2016
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Your Auto insurance rates are based on a variety of factors such as your driving record, mileage, the car you drive and your age.

Rates are highest for drivers in their teens and early 20, tend to fall for those aged 30 to 60-something, and then start climbing again around age 70. Although drivers in this age range tend to drive less and are more mature, their vision and reflexes are declining. They're also more likely to be injured in an accident than their younger counterparts, and to suffer more severely because they're physically weaker. Also. They often drive smaller cars, which are more vulnerable to damage. Here are five ways that senior drivers can keep their Auto insurance rates affordable. :
  1. Update your mileage. You can get a discount of 5% to 10% if you no longer commute or drive long distances.
  2. Use a telematics device. A usage-based or pay-as-you-go Auto insurance program can reduce premiums by 5% to as much as 40%.
  3. Take a class. Most states require Auto insurers to offer "mature drivers" (who can be as young as 55) a discount of 5% to 15% for completing an accident-prevention course.
  4. Exclude a driver. In some states, you might be able to drop coverage on a driver who no longer gets behind the wheel.
  5. Make your car safer. Some insurance companies offer discounts for anti-theft devices, airbags and anti-lock brakes.
Bear in mind that drivers can use some of these methods at any age and save on Auto insurance by raising their deductible or reducing coverage. To make sure you get the protection you need at a cost you can afford, just give us a call.

Three Seconds for Safety

Author TonyScurich , 7/17/2015

Rear-end collisions are the most common accidents between vehicles.1 They occur when drivers do not have enough time to perceive and react safely to slowing or stopped traffic. Increasing your following distance can help give you time to react when someone brakes in front of you.

The Three-Second Rule

Increasing the distance between you and the car ahead can help give you the time you need to recognize a hazard and respond safely. The National Safety Council recommends a minimum three second following distance.2

Determining the three-second gap is relatively easy. When following a vehicle, pick an overhead road sign, a tree or other roadside marker. Note when the vehicle ahead passes that marker, then see how many seconds it takes (count 1-1,000; 2-1,000; 3-1,000) for you to pass the same spot. If it is not at least three seconds, leave more space and increase your following distance.

Think of following distance in terms of time, not space. With a standard of 2.5 seconds, highway engineers use time, rather than distance, to represent how long it takes a driver to perceive and react to hazards. The National Safety Council also uses this standard (plus a little extra for safety) when recommending the three-second rule for following distance.3

Sometimes Three Seconds Is Not Enough

The three-second rule is recommended for passenger vehicles during ideal road and weather conditions. Slow down and increase your following distance even more during adverse weather conditions or when visibility is reduced. Also increase your following distance if you are driving a larger vehicle or towing a trailer.

Distractions, such as texting, reaching for a drink or glancing at a navigation device, also play a role in rear-end collisions. Even if you use the three-second rule, you may not have time to react to a hazard if you are distracted. It is another reason why you should avoid distractions while driving.4

  


Safe packing for travel

Author TonyScurich , 7/13/2015
Nine out of 10 Americans drive to their travel destination.¹ If you are among those planning to hit the road, remember: safe driving starts before you even leave the driveway. Securing luggage, maintaining vehicle balance and keeping clear lines of sight from the driver’s seat is key. Learn how to pack your vehicle for safer travels in these videos with Travelers specialist Chris Hayes — and make your road trip a memorable one, for all the right reasons. Watch "Drive Safe: How to Pack Safe"   Sources: ¹http://www.rita.dot.gov/bts/sites/rita.dot.gov.bts/files/subject_areas/national_household_travel_survey/long_distance.html Travelers

Consider a Parent-Teen Safe Driving Contract?

Author TonyScurich , 4/15/2015
Hand pen keysOne of the scariest moments of a parent's life is when they hand a teen the car keys and watch one of their most precious possessions, their own flesh and blood, roll out of the driveway. Most parents wonder at this moment whether their kids are really ready for the massive responsibility of driving a car. Will their teen follow the rules of the road? Will she take unnecessary chances in the vehicle? Do their kids really understand how quickly a car can spin out of control or how it takes just a moment's inattention to cause a serious accident? Many parents find that driving adds a whole new set of issues to argue about with their teens. Some parents find that creating a safe driving contract helps everyone in the family get on the same page with regards to driving. This contract outlines what parents expect of teens when they are on the road. Use the following ideas to craft a safe driving contract for your own kids. Passengers Do you want to allow your teen driver to transport friends across town? If so, you should specify how many passengers are permitted in the car. Remember that having other teens in the car can cause the driver to become distracted and possibly cause an accident. Late Nights With the busy schedules that most teens keep, you may want to discuss what time you need your teen to be home. Emphasize that this is a safety issue, rather than a control issue, since sleepy driving can cause accidents. No Drinking and Driving Many teens know this already, but don't be afraid to write it down to emphasize how very foolish the choice to drink and drive is. Tell them that they can always call you to get a ride home, even if they are ashamed of where they are and who they are with. Tickets and Accidents Spell out the consequences of moving violations and accidents. You may want your teen to pay for his own tickets and pay for repairs to the car if the accident is his fault. No Texting and Driving Tell your teen that the cell phone should be on silent and out of his reach while driving. Even reading an incoming text can be dangerous while driving. After you have written down your thoughts about safe driving, discuss the points of the contract with your teen. Be sure to keep the conversation positive and affirming, and remind your teen that driving is a privilege. If he wants to keep this privilege, he has to play by your rules, even if he thinks they are overprotective and silly. If you need advice about your teen's auto insurance, contact Scurich Insurance Services today!

Possible discounts for your California teen driver

Author TonyScurich , 4/8/2015
Kid drivingAs parents, sometimes we never want our kids to grow up. It is no secret that adding a teen driver to your California auto insurance is a costly choice. In some cases, you might see your insurance premium double almost overnight when you add your teen. There is good reason for this jump in price as the Centers for Disease Controls (CDC) notes that car crashes are the top cause of death for people ages 15 to 19. There are ways you can save money though.

Take a Safe Driving Course

With accident rates disproportionately higher for teen drivers than for other segment of the population, more education can help tip the balance. Taking a safe driving course can give your teen valuable skills while teaching them to be a more defensive driver. Many insurance companies provide discounts for the successful completion of such a course.

Purchase an Older Car

While every teen wants a brand new sports car as their first set of wheels, the insurance on such a vehicle will be quite high -- especially when combined with the hit your premium will take for having your teen on your insurance plan in the first place. Consider getting your freshly-minted teen driver an older set of wheels. While new cars tend to have safety features that many older cars lack, buying a used car that is a few years old can provide you with a good compromise.

Be a Good Student

Many insurance companies want to reward teens that are also good students. While the criteria can vary depending on the insurance company, if your student is on the honor roll or dean's list, is in the top 20 percent of standardized tests or maintains a B average or above, they could be eligible for a significant discount on their insurance.

Fatal accident is suspected DUI

Author TonyScurich , 8/21/2014
Official U.S. Navy photo released by Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Marianas Public Affairs Officer, LT. A. Chisholm.On Saturday, August 9th a 2014 Ford Fusion was involved in a one car crash that left one person dead.  24 year old, Gwynne Coye of Aptos, a passenger in the vehicle, was killed and the driver, Marquis Edwards was arrested.  Murder, Felony evading a police officer resulting in death, and other charges were filed against Marquis Edwards. If Marquis is convicted on all counts, he faces life in prison.  His next court date is Aug. 22nd. Watson Murder Law The Watson Murder Law was enacted after the case of People v. Watson.   Defendant Watson had several prior convictions for drinking and driving.  In this case, his actions resulted in the death of another human being.  Implied malice is the term prosecutors use in order to charge a defendant with murder.  When you drink and drive, a person knows that their actions can cause the death of another human, hence implied malice.  Generally, murder charges in a drinking and driving case are only imposed against a defendant who has prior convictions for DUI. Insurance and DUI If you have been convicted of a DUI, you could find yourself without insurance.  If you find an insurance company who will provide coverage, they will need to provide you with an SR-22 so you can file with your local DMV. Scurich Insurance Services can assist you with any questions you may have if you are in this situation. Content provided by Transformer Marketing. Sources:  http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/santacruz/ci_26332756/driver-charged-murder-santa-cruz-crash http://www.avvo.com/legal-guides/ugc/california-dui-murder-aka-the-watson-murder-rule

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