keyboard_backspaceBack to main blog page

Scurich Insurance Services - Blog

Scurich Insurance Services has been serving the Monterey Bay Area since 1924. Our mission is to partner with our customers and provide them superior service and value. We are a member of United Valley Insurance Services, Inc., a cluster of over 70 California Independent Insurance agencies, which produced over $530,000,000 of annual premium last year. At Scurich Insurance Services we understand your business and our community. Our customers look to us for comprehensive solutions. We have established relationships with more than 40 of the nation’s leading insurance providers, which allows us to deliver multiple, competitively-priced options and a team of experts to guide you through the process. When you need to file a claim, change a policy or process a certificate you can depend on Scurich Insurance Services to respond quickly to your request. SERVICES In order to provide value added benefits to our customers that go beyond the insurance policy Scurich Insurance Services offers the following additional services: Safety Programs – English and Spanish OSHA Compliance Safety Policies – English and Spanish Online OSHA 300 Log Safety Posters and Payroll Stuffers - English and Spanish Certificates of Insurance – If received before 3:30pm done the same day Risk Management Consulting Brokerage Services Represent most major insurance companies to better market your account. Safety tapes/DVD’s BUSINESS LINES Commercial Commercial Packages Business Auto Workers Compensation Umbrella Bonds Directors & Officers Professional Liability Employment Practices Liability Personal Auto Home Umbrella Recreational Vehicles Boatss Life & Health Individual Medical Individual Life Group Medical Group Benefits

Search Results

Posts tagged with teens - teens

Auto Insurance: Saving $$ In Your Golden Years

Author TonyScurich , 5/2/2016
1

Your Auto insurance rates are based on a variety of factors such as your driving record, mileage, the car you drive and your age.

Rates are highest for drivers in their teens and early 20, tend to fall for those aged 30 to 60-something, and then start climbing again around age 70. Although drivers in this age range tend to drive less and are more mature, their vision and reflexes are declining. They're also more likely to be injured in an accident than their younger counterparts, and to suffer more severely because they're physically weaker. Also. They often drive smaller cars, which are more vulnerable to damage. Here are five ways that senior drivers can keep their Auto insurance rates affordable. :
  1. Update your mileage. You can get a discount of 5% to 10% if you no longer commute or drive long distances.
  2. Use a telematics device. A usage-based or pay-as-you-go Auto insurance program can reduce premiums by 5% to as much as 40%.
  3. Take a class. Most states require Auto insurers to offer "mature drivers" (who can be as young as 55) a discount of 5% to 15% for completing an accident-prevention course.
  4. Exclude a driver. In some states, you might be able to drop coverage on a driver who no longer gets behind the wheel.
  5. Make your car safer. Some insurance companies offer discounts for anti-theft devices, airbags and anti-lock brakes.
Bear in mind that drivers can use some of these methods at any age and save on Auto insurance by raising their deductible or reducing coverage. To make sure you get the protection you need at a cost you can afford, just give us a call.

Consider a Parent-Teen Safe Driving Contract?

Author TonyScurich , 4/15/2015
Hand pen keysOne of the scariest moments of a parent's life is when they hand a teen the car keys and watch one of their most precious possessions, their own flesh and blood, roll out of the driveway. Most parents wonder at this moment whether their kids are really ready for the massive responsibility of driving a car. Will their teen follow the rules of the road? Will she take unnecessary chances in the vehicle? Do their kids really understand how quickly a car can spin out of control or how it takes just a moment's inattention to cause a serious accident? Many parents find that driving adds a whole new set of issues to argue about with their teens. Some parents find that creating a safe driving contract helps everyone in the family get on the same page with regards to driving. This contract outlines what parents expect of teens when they are on the road. Use the following ideas to craft a safe driving contract for your own kids. Passengers Do you want to allow your teen driver to transport friends across town? If so, you should specify how many passengers are permitted in the car. Remember that having other teens in the car can cause the driver to become distracted and possibly cause an accident. Late Nights With the busy schedules that most teens keep, you may want to discuss what time you need your teen to be home. Emphasize that this is a safety issue, rather than a control issue, since sleepy driving can cause accidents. No Drinking and Driving Many teens know this already, but don't be afraid to write it down to emphasize how very foolish the choice to drink and drive is. Tell them that they can always call you to get a ride home, even if they are ashamed of where they are and who they are with. Tickets and Accidents Spell out the consequences of moving violations and accidents. You may want your teen to pay for his own tickets and pay for repairs to the car if the accident is his fault. No Texting and Driving Tell your teen that the cell phone should be on silent and out of his reach while driving. Even reading an incoming text can be dangerous while driving. After you have written down your thoughts about safe driving, discuss the points of the contract with your teen. Be sure to keep the conversation positive and affirming, and remind your teen that driving is a privilege. If he wants to keep this privilege, he has to play by your rules, even if he thinks they are overprotective and silly. If you need advice about your teen's auto insurance, contact Scurich Insurance Services today!

Teens Know Drinking, Texting Risks But Don’t Always Drive Like They Do

Author TonyScurich , 5/5/2014
Scurich Insurance Services, CA, Distracted drivingFrom drinking or texting while driving to using a designated driver, there is a disconnect between what teenagers acknowledge as risky behavior and what they actually admit to doing behind the wheel, according to a survey from Liberty Mutual Insurance and SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions). While teens know certain behaviors and situations are risky, many don’t apply that knowledge when it comes to getting behind the wheel. For example, a good number say that it is acceptable for a designated driver to have alcohol or that a designated driver is simply the most sober person in a group. Also, a majority of teens admits to using a cell phone while driving despite knowing the danger.

Drink and Drive

According to the survey results, teens claim to understand the dangers surrounding drinking and driving:
  • The majority (86 percent) of teen drivers consider driving under the influence of alcohol to be extremely or very distracting
  • Only 1 percent of teens define driving under the influence of alcohol as acceptable
  • Only 5 percent of teens admit to at least sometimes driving under the influence of alcohol
However, when asked about actual driving behavior involving alcohol, driving “under the influence” takes on a different definition:
  • One in 10 teens who say they never drive under the influence acknowledge that they occasionally drive after having an alcoholic beverage
  • More than two-thirds of teens (68 percent) who admit to driving under the influence of alcohol say they have done so after having more than three alcoholic beverages
According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, a quarter of fatal crashes involving young drivers resulting from drinking and driving. “While many teens seem to have gotten the message about these driving dangers, the real challenge is to make sure they understand that even a sip of alcohol or a quick text at a red light can be deadly,” said David Melton, driving safety expert with Liberty Mutual Insurance and managing director of global safety. “Teens need to realize it’s not acceptable to put an allowable limit to their engagement in these behaviors – they need to be eliminated entirely when they are behind the wheel.”

Defining ‘Designated’

While underage drinking is never acceptable and always illegal, many teens and parents consider a designated driver to be a safe alternative to impaired driving. In fact, more than half of parents (58 percent) encourage teens to use designated drivers to avoid driving under the influence, and almost half of teens (47 percent) admit to using one. However, teens’ definitions of “designated” are concerning:
  • Designated Means “Basically Sober”: 21 percent of teens define their designated driver as allowed to have “a little” alcohol or other drugs, as long as they aren’t too impaired to drive
  • Designated Means “Least Impaired”: 4 percent of teens describe their designated driver as the “most” sober person in the group
“With teens reporting these lax definitions of what it means to be ‘under the influence,’ a zero tolerance approach is the only answer to prevent potential tragedy,” said Stephen Gray Wallace, senior advisor for policy, research and education at SADD. “The parents and community have a responsibility to initiate and maintain an open dialogue with teens about exactly what driving under the influence means.” SADD is peer-to-peer youth education, prevention, and activism organization.

Talking and Texting

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, more than 3,300 deaths were reported in 2012 alone as the result of distracted driving, many attributed to talking or texting on a cell phone. Teens seem to understand the dangers of these behaviors:
  • Nearly all (96 percent) teen drivers understand that using a cell phone while driving – either talking or texting – is at least slightly distracting
  • 62 percent of teen drivers think texting and driving is extremely or very distracting
However, according to the new data, teen drivers often do not grasp the dangers of what it actually means to use a phone while driving:
  • The majority of teen drivers (86 percent) still admit to using a cell phone behind the wheel
  • Nearly half (47 percent) of the teen drivers who say they never text while driving still admit to texting at a red light or stop sign
  • 68 percent of teen drivers admit to reading or replying to text messages while driving
“It’s critical not only for teens, but all drivers to understand that any time you pull out your phone when you are driving, whether you’re moving or at a stoplight, your attention is diverted and you put yourself, passengers and others on the road at risk,” said Melton. “If you need to use your phone while driving, find a safe place to pull off the road to make a call or send a text. It’s not worth the risk to respond at a stop sign or before the light turns green.”

About the Study

Liberty Mutual Insurance and SADD commissioned ORC International to conduct a qualitative and quantitative methodology to measure teen driving attitudes and behaviors. The study was initiated with a series of focus groups held in Philadelphia, Pa., and Dallas, Texas from May 29 – May 30, 2013, followed by a survey of 2,537 eleventh and twelfth graders from across the country. Overall the findings from the study can be interpreted at a 95 percent confidence interval with an error margin of +/- 1.68 percent. Error margins for subsets such as licensed drivers will be wider. Additionally, the study surveyed 1,000 parents of high school aged teenage drivers, providing an overall error margin of +/- 2.94 percent. Content provided by http://www.insurancejournal.com/news/national/2014/03/18/323582.htm