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Scurich Insurance Services has been serving the Monterey Bay Area since 1924. Our mission is to partner with our customers and provide them superior service and value. We are a member of United Valley Insurance Services, Inc., a cluster of over 70 California Independent Insurance agencies, which produced over $530,000,000 of annual premium last year. At Scurich Insurance Services we understand your business and our community. Our customers look to us for comprehensive solutions. We have established relationships with more than 40 of the nation’s leading insurance providers, which allows us to deliver multiple, competitively-priced options and a team of experts to guide you through the process. When you need to file a claim, change a policy or process a certificate you can depend on Scurich Insurance Services to respond quickly to your request. SERVICES In order to provide value added benefits to our customers that go beyond the insurance policy Scurich Insurance Services offers the following additional services: Safety Programs – English and Spanish OSHA Compliance Safety Policies – English and Spanish Online OSHA 300 Log Safety Posters and Payroll Stuffers - English and Spanish Certificates of Insurance – If received before 3:30pm done the same day Risk Management Consulting Brokerage Services Represent most major insurance companies to better market your account. Safety tapes/DVD’s BUSINESS LINES Commercial Commercial Packages Business Auto Workers Compensation Umbrella Bonds Directors & Officers Professional Liability Employment Practices Liability Personal Auto Home Umbrella Recreational Vehicles Boatss Life & Health Individual Medical Individual Life Group Medical Group Benefits

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Posts tagged with tips - tips

4th of july Tips

Author TonyScurich , 7/1/2016

fourth-of-july-1

4th of July fireworks, parades and cookouts are an excuse for you to relax with family and friends. As you plan your celebration this year, take several steps to ensure safety for everyone involved in celebrating the United States' birthday.

Use Fireworks Safely Public fireworks displays are the safest way to enjoy the beautiful colors and terrific booms of this July 4th tradition, especially when you maintain a distance of at least 500 feet between you and the show. Firework displays at home can be fun though too. If you go that route, take these precautions.

  • Follow the instructions on the packaging.
  • Never allow children to play with the fireworks.
  • Stock a fire extinguisher or water supply nearby.
  • Wear eye protection when lighting fireworks.
  • Remove flammable materials from the area.
  • Never point fireworks toward people, animals, vehicles or structures.
  • Properly dispose of duds rather than trying to relight them.

Take Precautions While Grilling

Burgers, hot dogs, fruit and pizza taste delicious when they're grilled. Grab your favorite side dishes and follow a few precautions that ensure you and your guests grill safely.

  • Always supervise the grill when it's in use.
  • Never grill indoors or in a fully enclosed area such as a garage or tent.
  • Use lighter fluid sparingly and never after the coals are ignited.
  • Keep children and pets away from the hot grill.
  • Remove flammable objects, including trees, from near the grill.
  • Use long-handled tools to handle food.

Stay Safe on the Beach

Swimming is a fun summer activity, and it's good exercise. At the beach, lake, public pool or backyard pool, stay safe with these tips.

  • Swim only in designated areas.
  • Obey the lifeguard and all posted signs.
  • Swim sober.
  • Get out of the water during a storm or if you hear thunder or see lightening.
  • Require children to wear life jackets.
  • Don't dive into shallow water.

Wear Sun Bathing Protection

Picnics are part of many July 4th celebrations. You should also take these protective measures.

  • Wear sunscreen that's at least 15 SPF.
  • Remember to apply sunscreen to your ears, hair part and the tops of your feet.
  • Avoid direct sunlight between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. when the UV rays are strongest.
  • Reapply sunscreen every two to three hours or more frequently if you're sweating.
  • Drink plenty of water even if you're not thirsty.
  • Wear a hat, sunglasses and long sleeves if you have to be in direct sunlight.
  • Watch for signs of heat stroke, including hot, red skin, shallow breathing and rapid, weak pulse.

Your July 4th celebration will be safe when you take these steps. For more advice, talk to your health insurance agent. He or she stands ready to help you have the best birthday party ever.


Need Tips For OCIPS?

Author TonyScurich , 1/13/2016

2For years, Owner-Controlled Insurance Programs (OCIPs) were only found on large, single-site projects. Every day, more contractors are being required to work under these types of arrangements, either on smaller projects or "rolling" OCIPs that cover multiple projects. This requires contractors to identify and deal with the variety of complex issues that these programs raise.

Don't go it alone. Our Construction Insurance professionals stand ready to help. If you'd like to do some research on your own, the Insurance Risk Management Institute (IRMI) provides a wealth of solid safety guidelines that are updated frequently. Originally created as a resource for contractor risk management information, IRMI publishes one of the best and most extensive libraries of insurance expertise in the nation and is widely used by insurance agents and risk managers in all types of businesses.

"A Contractor's Guide to OCIPs," available on the Construction Business Owner Web site, offers valuable guidelines on the benefits and risks of these programs, together with tips on making the most from them, and dealing with such issues as loss costs, separating Construction Insurance costs from bids, and estimating labor expenses.

Check out the guide. Then give us a call on how to apply its principles to your business. When it comes to your protection, don't let "owner controlled" mean "out of control.


Winter Driving Tips

Author TonyScurich , 12/14/2015
aquaplaning-83008_1280Any travel during winter months is risky. Storms come out of nowhere, roads become icy quickly and inexperienced drivers take unwise risks. Be prepared to stay safe on the road thanks to eight winter driving tips. 1. Check the forecast. In less than a minute, you can find out if you'll be driving in fog, snow or ice. You can also discover which roads are blocked and if you need to find an alternative route to your destination. 2. Slow down. In snowy conditions, cut your speed in half to ensure you have adequate stopping distance. Don't go so slow, though, that you lose momentum on grades. 3. Know skid recovery. Braking on slippery roads can cause your vehicle to slide instead of stop. If this happens, you need to know how to recover. Stay off the brake and steer your vehicle the way you want it to go. 4. Stay smooth at the controls. Pounding on the brake, shifting hard and even clenching the steering wheel make winter driving harder than it has to be. Instead, use smooth motions and relax as you drive. 5. Check your tires. Proper tire inflation and tread improve your vehicle's traction and ability to stay on the wet or icy roads. Check the inflation of your snow tires frequently since cold weather decreases tire pressure, and make sure the tread is at least 1/8-inch. Carry snow chains, too, if necessary. 6. Know your vehicle. Every car and truck handles differently. Before heading out in winter weather, make sure you know how your vehicle handles. Know where the windshield wipers, defrost button and four-ways are, too. 7. Pack survival supplies. If you're stranded or in an accident, you need a few supplies. Definitely store a snow shovel, sand or litter and lock de-icer in your vehicle. Consider packing a portable power source, flashlight, waterproof matches, tow rope, first aid kit, energy bars and blanket also. If you do get stranded, wait for help to arrive. 8. Stay hydrated. Dehydration can make you drowsy and reduce alertness. Drink water before you head out and carry a bottle or two with you so that you can stay alert. Winter driving can be dangerous, but follow these eight tips to stay safe. Remember to check in with your auto insurance agent, too. Update your policy as you prepare for whatever winter throws at you on the road.

Protect Your Identity as you Take Online Classes

Author TonyScurich , 8/14/2015

Any time you get online, including while you take online classes, you run the risk of having your identity stolen. Be vigilant and protect yourself with seven tips.

1. Use multiple email addresses. Separate your school, business and personal email addresses to limit a thief's access to your information. Change your passwords at least once a month, too. 2. Don't share information with third parties. Entering a scholarship contest or signing up for a newsletter about careers can be helpful, but will the site sell your name, phone number, or email and home addresses to a third party? Always read the fine print and uncheck the "permission to share your information" box. 3. Use a secure browser as you surf the Internet and make purchases. Start by setting high security options on your browser. Then, shop only at encrypted and secure sites with "https" and a lock symbol on the address bar. 4. Clear the cookies and cache. They store pages you've viewed recently and give valuable personal information to anyone with access to your computer. 5. Install spyware protection. Numerous products, including Norton and Kaspersky, protect your computer from keyloggers and other online hijackers. In addition to stopping potential threats, use these software tools to scan your computer for dangers. 6. Avoid spam. Not only does it clutter your inbox, but it can deliver dangerous viruses to your computer. Stop spam by not opening email attachments from people you don't know or trust. Then, block email addresses from known spam offenders. 7. Share wisely. If you decide to share personal information with a classmate or school-related business, do so wisely. Use your common sense and protect your identity as much as possible by using a pseudonym and concealing your birthday, hometown and other identifiable information. Online classes advance your career and can be fun. You'll want to use these seven tips to protect your identity, however. Additionally, consider Identity Protection insurance as an extra layer of security.  

Stay Safe While Exercising This Summer

Author TonyScurich , 7/24/2015

You might love the warm summer temperatures, but they can be dangerous when you are working out. If you are not careful, you could end up with dehydration or heatstroke. The following tips can help you keep up stay safe while you stay in good shape over the summer.

Exercise During the Cool Parts of the Day Avoid the intense heat of the noon-time sun when possible. Instead of going for a walk during your lunch break, exercise early in the morning when temperatures are lowest. Another option is to wait until the sun goes down and the temperature starts to drop in the evening. If you work out before dawn or after sunset, wear reflective clothing so that car drivers can see you more easily. If you exercise during the day, use sunscreen. Stay Hydrated You can quickly become dehydrated when you exercise. To prevent dehydration, men should drink 12 8-ounce cups and women should get 8 cups of water per day. You need extra water when the weather is windy or dry. Consume an additional 2 cups of water about an hour before your workout, and drink 8 ounces of water every 15 minutes while you are exercising. Weigh yourself before and after your workout, and drink an additional 16 ounces, or half-liter, of water for every pound that you lost during your workout. Symptoms of mild dehydration can include thirst, headaches, fatigue, muscle cramping and muscle weakness. Stop exercising and drink some water immediately if you notice these symptoms. Adjust Your Exercise Program Be flexible with your exercise program during the summer. Water activities, such as swimming laps or taking water aerobics classes, can give you an excellent aerobic workout while you stay cool compared to participating in activities such as running or cycling. You can also adjust your workout program while maintaining a high level of fitness by lowering the intensity of your exercise sessions on hot days. Finally, you can opt for indoors workouts instead of heading outdoors. You can follow an exercise DVD in your own air-conditioned home, or go to a health club with air conditioning. There, you can run on the treadmill, use the stationary bikes or elliptical machines, lift weights, and take group fitness classes without exposing yourself to the sun. With a bit of caution, you can have fun, stay fit, and stay safe this summer.  

Preparing for a summer road trip

Author TonyScurich , 6/22/2015
Summer Travel Safety Tips
During the summer months, many families embark on vacation getaways. Summer travel and readying the car for trips can be the most stressful part of the vacation. Travelers offers some packing and driving tips for families hitting the road for vacation this summer.
Car - Vacation

74%

of Americans taking a summer vacation

plan to drive

Vacation Image Bar
Don't overload When packing, the car can get filled quickly. Spread out the load so the weight is evenly distributed Be a prepared parent Pack snacks, extra clothes and entertaining items that will keep your little ones in the back seat happy. Keep a clear view When packing your vehicle, make sure you maintain a proper line of sight with your mirrors and windows. Ready the roof rack Know your rack's weight limit by checking the user's manual. Recognize the height of your vehicle after packing to prevent damage or accidents.
In 2011alone, over 3,000 people were killed in distracted driving crashes.‡
Vacation Image Bar2
Know the route Familiarize yourself with the route before leaving for your trip. Relying solely upon GPS can lead to dangerous last minute turns and lane changes. Secure your pets Unsecured pets can become a distraction. Secure your pets appropriately and never let them run about the vehicle. Cruise carefully Cruise control can be a helpful tool, but be careful when using it on long trips, as it can make it easier for drivers to lose focus on the road. Take a break When travelling long distances, it's important to take frequent breaks to help maintain focus and avoid fatigue.
†TripAdvisor, nc:http://ir.tripadvisor.com/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=764664 ‡ NHTSA: http://www.distraction.gov

Hotter than healthy: surviving extreme heat

Author TonyScurich , 6/12/2015

Warmer weather means more people enjoying outdoor activities. But extreme temperatures have killed more people in recent years than other natural disasters combined.1 Between 1999 and 2009, an average of 658 heat-related deaths occurred per year.2

Turning the Heat Down – Preventing Heat Stroke and Heat Exhaustion Whether you are working or playing in the sun, the risk of heat exhaustion and heat stroke increases with the temperature.

The following tips can help you stay safe:

  • Drink ample cool water throughout the day. Avoid excessive alcohol and caffeine, soda or fruit juice. 3
  • Wear a hat and light-colored clothing. 4
  • Try to limit exertion to cooler periods of the day.
  • Take frequent breaks and rest if feeling weak.
  • Be aware that some medications may make you more vulnerable to sun and heat exposure.
  • If air temperature is higher than 95° F, fans will be ineffective and air conditioning should be used instead.
  • Apply wet towels or headbands to help beat the heat.
  • Help replace lost fluids from your body with water or sports drinks.5

Heat Injury - Know the Warning Signs

Heat exhaustion and heat stroke are the most common problems when the body is exposed to excessive temperatures.6

Heat exhaustion results when you spend long periods of time exposed to high temperatures and your body gets too hot.

Symptoms  Symptoms of heat exhaustion can include, but are not limited to:

  • Dizziness
  • Weakness
  • Headaches
  • Blurred vision
  • Nausea
  • Staggering
  • Paleness
  • Profuse sweating
  • Weak pulse
  • Faint breathing
  • Unconsciousness

Treatment  The following tips can help treat heat exhaustion:

  • Go to a shady location or a room with air conditioning
  • Lie down and stay calm
  • Take frequent small sips of cool water or a sports drink
  • Call the doctor if symptoms persist as heat exhaustion can quickly become heat stroke.

Heat stroke can potentially be life threatening since it can cause you to lose the ability to sweat and control body temperature.

Symptoms Symptoms of heat stroke can include, but are not limited to:

  • Severe headache
  • Face is red and skin is hot and dry
  • No sweating
  • Pulse is strong and very fast
  • Vomiting and diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Confusion
  • Convulsions
  • Unconsciousness

Treatment

  • If you believe a co-worker or loved one is suffering from heat stroke,call 911 immediately and follow directions given by emergency personnel. Move the person to a room with air conditioning or to the shade to help cool him or her and loosen his or her clothing.

5 things parents must know to have "the talk"...about safe driving

Author TonyScurich , 6/5/2015

car driverAs a caring parent, you have tackled your share of difficult talks with your children, from bullying to underage drinking. Now, as your teen prepares to get behind the wheel, get ready to have “the talk” about safe driving. It may be the most critical conversation that you have with your child.

Car crashes are the leading cause of death among teen drivers, according to theCenters of Disease Control and Prevention.

Due to driving inexperience, teens are more likely to be involved in an accident than other drivers, according to the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration.  

Based on research, here are five tips to help your “talk” about safe driving be more effective:

  1. Be confident. Know that you can positively influence your child’s behavior behind the wheel.1   
  2. Be a safe driver yourself (if you are not already). Teens tend to follow your example.2
  3. Know the facts about teen driving. Some teens increase their already high collision risk by speeding, drinking, driving at night, having peers as pass engers, and being distracted. Your state likely has Graduated Driver Licensing laws to discourage such risky behaviors among new drivers. Learn about them. And resolve to enforce them, along with other like-minded parents.
  4. Approach your talk like a great coach. Stay calm, and set clear expectations and consequences regarding dangerous driving behaviors mentioned above. Also, put expectations in writing in a simple parent-teen driving contract. And give lots of encouragement. Kids, including adolescents, respond best to positive reinforcement.3 
  5. Stay involved. Keep a close eye on your teen’s behavior behind the wheel – even after obtaining a license. Continue to coach them about how to drive more safely. Learning to drive safely takes time, experience, judgment and skill. You may want to consider installing a monitoring device; it provides data on driving behaviors that need improvement. And, understand that you will need to have multiple “talks” with your child.

1 B. Simons-Morton, M.C. Ouimet, “Parent involvement in novice teen driving: a review of the literature,” Injury Prevention, 2006; 12 (Suppl l)i30-i37; Ferguson SA, Williams AF, Chapline JF, Reinfurth DW, DeLeonardis DM. Relationship of parent driving records to the driving records of their children. Accid Anal Prev.2001;33 :229– 234 2 Ibid 3 A. Kazdin, “The Kazdin Method for Parenting the Defiant Child,” New York, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, 2008.


Ways to help you stay safe in a work zone

Author TonyScurich , 6/1/2015
Be careful driving through work zones

Roadwork can be frustrating, but it is a necessary fact of life.  When you have to be somewhere and traffic builds because of roadwork, it can be easy to become impatient – which can be dangerous in a work zone.  Did you know work zones are a major cause of auto accidents? During 2012, these accidents resulted in 609 fatalities and about 32,000 injuries.¹ Here are some tips that can help you and others stay safe when there is roadwork ahead:

  • Be prepared for the unexpected. Things can change quickly in work zones. Slowed or stopped traffic, a traffic lane closure, or equipment and workers on the roadway are all possible.
  • Slow down. More than one-third of fatal accidents in work zones are caused by speeding.² Obey the posted speed limit, even if you do not see any work currently in progress. 
  • Keep a safe following distance. Rear-end collisions account for 30 percent of work zone accidents.³ Keep a safe distance between you and other cars and construction workers and equipment to help avoid accidents.
  • Obey road crew flaggers and road signs. Flaggers and warning signs are there to help all drivers move safely through the work zone.
  • Stay alert and focused. Your full attention should be on the road. Multitasking while driving is never recommended, especially through a work zone. 
  • Keep up with traffic. Do not slow down to watch the roadwork.
  • Plan ahead. Before hitting the road, check a traffic report for delays. Be sure to plan enough time to help you reach your destination on time.
  • Be patient. While roadwork can be an inconvenience, remember that the crews are working to improve roads and make everyone’s drive safer.

Grilling safely

Author TonyScurich , 5/11/2015

shish-kebabMany Americans fire up the grill when the weather is warm, especially during summer holidays and family get-togethers. This adds up to more than three billion barbecues a year. But serious accidents can occur without proper precautions.

Here are some important tips to help you keep danger away when you are enjoying food and fun:

Choose a safe location for your grill. According to the National Fire Protection Association, more than one-quarter (27%) of home structure fires involving grills started on a courtyard, terrace or patio and 29% started on an exterior balcony or open porch.* Keep grills on a level surface more than 10 feet away from the house, garage, deck rails or other structures. Keep away from children, pets, landscaping and overhanging branches. Grills should not be used on a balcony or under an overhang.

Grill outside only! Never use a grill in a garage, vehicle, tent or other enclosed space, even if ventilated, due to risk of harmful carbon monoxide buildup.

Keep gas grills and supplies safe. Always store gas grills – and propane tanks – outside and away from your house. Turn off valves if the odor of gas is detected or when not in use. Check at least annually for leaks in the connections.

Use the right fuel the right way. While starting and maintaining the flame in a charcoal grill can be challenging, avoid shortcuts. Only use starter fluids intended for these grills. Never use gasoline or too much starter fluid. If the fire is too low, rekindle with dry kindling and more charcoal if needed. Avoid adding liquid fuel because it can cause a flash fire. Do not leave grill unattended.

Do not forget post-grilling safety. Keep your grill clean by removing grease or fat buildup from the grills and in trays below the grill. If using a charcoal grill, dispose of coals by soaking them in water to let them cool completely and placing them in a closed metal container away from your home, garage or deck. Be aware that grills themselves remain hot long after extinguished.