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At Fleming Financial Services, Inc., our role is to assist our clients in defining and realizing their financial objectives and goals. We work with our clients to implement personalized plans designed for their unique situations. Our areas of concentration are: Retirement planning, Estate and Wealth Transfer strategies, and Business Continuation planning. We emphasize the importance of conducting our business with integrity and professionalism. As a member of PartnersFinancial, an independent national financial services company, we are able to provide access to sophisticated resources for the benefit of our clients. Some of the professionals with our firm are currently registered to conduct business through NFP Securities, Inc. With those additional resources in place, we help facilitate the complex corporate and personal financial decisions our clients must make.
Paying the Bills: Potential Sources of Retirement Income - Part 1
Couple -BeachPlanning your retirement income is like putting together a puzzle with many different pieces. One of the first steps in the process is to identify all potential income sources and estimate how much you can expect each one to provide. Social Security According to the Social Security Administration (SSA), almost 9 of 10 people aged 65 or older receive Social Security benefits. However, most retirees also rely on other sources of income. For a rough estimate of the annual benefit to which you would be entitled at various retirement ages, you can use the calculator on the Social Security website, www.ssa.gov. Your Social Security retirement benefit is calculated using a formula that takes into account your 35 highest earnings years. How much you receive ultimately depends on a number of factors, including when you start taking benefits. You can begin doing so as early as age 62. However, your benefit may be 20% to 30% less than if you waited until full retirement age (65 to 67, depending on the year you were born). Benefits increase each year that you delay taking benefits until you reach age 70. As you're planning, remember that the question of how Social Security will meet its long-term obligations to both baby boomers and later generations has become a hot topic of discussion. Concerns about the system's solvency indicate that there's likely to be a change in how those benefits are funded, administered, and/or taxed over the next 20 or 30 years. That may introduce additional uncertainty about Social Security's role as part of your overall long-term retirement income picture, and put additional emphasis on other potential income. Pensions If you are entitled to receive a traditional pension, you're lucky; fewer Americans are covered by them every year. Be aware that even if you expect pension payments, many companies are changing their plan provisions. Ask your employer if your pension will increase with inflation, and if so, how that increase is calculated. Your pension will most likely be offered as either a single or a joint and survivor annuity. A single annuity provides benefits until the worker's death; a joint and survivor annuity provides reduced benefits that last until the survivor's death. The law requires married couples to take a joint and survivor annuity unless the spouse signs away those rights. Consider rejecting it only if the surviving spouse will have income that equals at least 75% of the current joint income. Be sure to fully plan your retirement budget before you make this decision. Major Sources of Retirement Income Major Sources of Retirement Income                 Note:Data may not total 100% due to rounding. Source:Fast Facts and Figures About Social Security, 2014, Social Security Administration

Securities and Investment Advisory Services may be offered through NFP Advisor Services, LLC, (NFPAS), member FINRA/SIPC. NFPASmay or may not be affiliated with the firm branded on this material.