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At Fleming Financial Services, Inc., our role is to assist our clients in defining and realizing their financial objectives and goals. We work with our clients to implement personalized plans designed for their unique situations. Our areas of concentration are: Retirement planning, Estate and Wealth Transfer strategies, and Business Continuation planning. We emphasize the importance of conducting our business with integrity and professionalism. As a member of PartnersFinancial, an independent national financial services company, we are able to provide access to sophisticated resources for the benefit of our clients. Some of the professionals with our firm are currently registered to conduct business through NFP Securities, Inc. With those additional resources in place, we help facilitate the complex corporate and personal financial decisions our clients must make.
The Roth 401(k) - Part 1
Thomas Joseph - Fleming Financial Services, PASome employers offer 401(k) plan participants the opportunity to make Roth 401(k) contributions. If you're lucky enough to work for an employer who offers this option, Roth contributions could play an important role in helping enhance your retirement income. What is a Roth 401(k)? A Roth 401(k) is simply a traditional 401(k) plan that accepts Roth 401(k) contributions. Roth 401(k) contributions are made on an after-tax basis, just like Roth IRA contributions. This means there's no up-front tax benefit, but if certain conditions are met, your Roth 401(k) contributions and all accumulated investment earnings on those contributions are free from federal income tax when distributed from the plan. (403(b) and 457(b) plans can also allow Roth contributions.) Who can contribute? Unlike Roth IRAs, where individuals who earn more than a certain dollar amount aren't allowed to contribute, you can make Roth contributions regardless of your salary level, as soon as you're eligible to participate in the plan. And while a 401(k) plan can require employees to wait up to one year before they become eligible to contribute, many plans allow you to contribute beginning with your first paycheck. How much can I contribute? There's an overall cap on your combined pretax and Roth 401(k) contributions. You can contribute up to $18,000 of your pay ($24,000 if you're age 50 or older) to a 401(k) plan in 2015. You can split your contribution any way you wish. For example, you can make $10,000 of Roth contributions and $8,000 of pretax 401(k) contributions. It's up to you. But keep in mind that if you also contribute to another employer's 401(k), 403(b), SIMPLE, or SAR-SEP plan, your total contributions to all of these plans--both pretax and Roth--can't exceed $18,000 ($24,000 if you're age 50 or older). It's up to you to make sure you don't exceed these limits if you contribute to plans of more than one employer. Can I also contribute to a Roth IRA? Yes. Your participation in a Roth 401(k) plan has no impact on your ability to contribute to a Roth IRA. You can contribute to both if you wish (assuming you meet the Roth IRA income limits). You can contribute up to $5,500 to a Roth IRA in 2015, $6,500 if you're age 50 or older (or, if less, 100% of your taxable compensation). If you have both a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA, your combined contributions to both cannot exceed $5,500 ($6,500 if age 50 or older) in 2015. Should I make pretax or Roth 401(k) contributions? When you make pretax 401(k) contributions, you don't pay current income taxes on those dollars but your contributions and investment earnings are fully taxable when you receive a distribution from the plan. In contrast, Roth 401(k) contributions are subject to income taxes up front, but qualified distributions of your contributions and earnings are entirely free from federal income tax. Which is the better option depends upon your personal situation. If you think you'll be in a similar or higher tax bracket when you retire, Roth 401(k) contributions may be more appealing, since you'll effectively lock in today's lower tax rates. However, if you think you'll be in a lower tax bracket when you retire, pretax 401(k) contributions may be more appropriate. Your investment horizon and projected investment results are also important factors. Before you take any specific action be sure to consult with your own tax or legal counsel. Prepared by Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. Copyright 2015 Securities and Investment Advisory Services may be offered through NFP Advisor Services, LLC, (NFPAS), member FINRA/SIPC. NFPAS may or may not be affiliated with the firm branded on this material.  
Thomas Joseph
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Categories: Financial Planning, Fleming Financial Services, Fleming Financial, General Information, Tom Joseph
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