Differneces Between Installation Floater and Builders Risk

Construction projects involve significant financial risk for the contractors and subcontractors who must pay workers and purchase materials. To help protect themselves against these financial losses, builders have a number of insurance options. Two of the most widely used coverages are Builders Risk and Installation Floaters. The choice you make depends on the nature of each job.

Builders Risk insurance pays for damage to materials or partially completed work due to accidents, fires, weather damage, material defects, and incorrect installation or workmanship. This coverage ensures that the time and money that the builder has invested in the project aren't lost when the costs of repairing, repurchasing or reconstructing add up and diminish profits.

Installation Floaters cover specific items that a contractor is planning to install. For example, a roofer might buy a policy to pay for the cost of roofing supplies, both during transit and while stored at the work site. An Installation Floater covers either all risks or specific sources of losses for moveable property (materials or equipment) specifically named in the policy.

Because of its more narrow coverage, an Installation Floater generally costs less than a Builders Risk policy. However, it leaves the builder more vulnerable to losses that aren't covered. This coverage would be appropriate for a contractor performing a specific installation task, or a subcontractor who takes on limited risk to perform a specific duty for a contractor as part of a larger project.

As Construction insurance professionals, we'd be happy to recommend the type of coverage best suited to protect you against losses on each job. Just give us a call at any time.
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Further Reading
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