Aging and the Workforce

Savvy employers should be aware of the changing needs of employees who are aging in the workforce. Those approaching age sixty and older may have very different interests and concerns than those who are just beginning their careers.

A particularly important issue to consider is health care. Companies who provide health care coverage for aging employees will want to become fully aware of the costs and benefits related to various health care policies, including disability and long-term care options. Benefits managers may want to compare policies and providers to obtain the most relevant coverage for employees who are growing older.

Another issue to keep in mind for aging employees is physical safety. Vision changes and mobility adjustments related to knee or hip replacements may be of concern. Inspecting the facility for adequate lighting and secure footing is a wise precaution for all employees, but especially for those with changing physical needs and abilities due to age. Similarly, on-site seminars about diet management and lifestyle-related health choices will likely benefit many employees -- in particular those who are aging and may be at a greater risk for health-related concerns.

Job assistance technology can also be of great value to older employees. Amplified voice controls for the phone or text enlargement for reading paper or electronic materials will enable employees to continue handling their job duties as their hearing or sight changes. You may find that some employees perform more efficiently after a transfer to a different position that better suits their physical capabilities.

Retirement planning materials and programs will help senior employees prepare to transition from full-time employment to part-time work or, eventually, full retirement. Organizing this information to ensure that it is readily available to older employees will be appreciated, helping avoid last-minute confusion and uncertainty. Details about pensions, Social Security, stock options and employer contribution accounts should be reviewed and updated as needed.

Aging is part of the workplace. Competent employers simply help workers adapt accordingly.

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Further Reading
Cornell University has published an interesting report outlining employer concerns about: an aging workforce. Absence and Disability Management Practices for an Aging Workforce http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1320&...
Demographic changes in today’s workplace are impacting the way risk managers handle lost Productivity, the cost of wage replacement, and skyrocketing workers comp premiums that are created by the health problems their employees face. Chronic medical...
Nearly one of four people aged 64 to 75 remain in the workforce — and the number will to skyrocket as the Baby Boomers reach retirement age, but want to stay active. The good news: Older workers have a lower injury rate. The bad news: Their...
Nearly one of four people aged 64 to 75 are still at work - and the number is skyrocketing, with more Baby Boomers who reach retirement age staying in the workplace. The good news: Older workers have a lower injury rate. The bad news: Their injuri...
Nearly one of four people aged 64 to 75 are still at work - and the number is skyrocketing, with more Baby Boomers who reach retirement age staying in the workplace. The good news: Older workers have a lower injury rate. The bad news: Their injuries ...