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https://completemarkets.com/company/terrace/American-Expatriates-Insurance/
Terrace CIM Carrier Interface Management Software Terrace CIM is advanced, flexible software designed for the Insurance industry. CIM allows 1) carriers to create download files for agencies and 2) agencies to process carrier information and store it locally. CIM is a simple, fast 'out of the box' solution for your interface processing requirements. Elegant, Scalable Architecture Terrace CIM utilizes a simple architecture for creating and processing Insurance information. The server / schema architecture integrates highly-available Windows Server services with abstracted file descriptions. CIM Engine The CIM engine is built to process a high volume of data - unattended - with complete support for activity logging, error processing and failover. The CIM engine is bi-directional, facilitating the writing and/or reading of standard files. CIM Schemas Terrace has abstracted each Insurance file description into simple, self documenting XML schemas. These schemas drive parsing and storage of the policy and accounting data. All Lines of Business CIM is built to process a variety of data, including Policy files (Personal Lines and Commercial Lines), Claims and Accounting (e.g., direct bill transactions). CIM processes standard files (AL3, ACORD XML, CSIO) and non-standard files (Excel, ASCII, etc.). Agencies & Carriers Terrace CIM is built to support reading and/or writing of standard and non-standard insurance files. All vendor agency systems are supported.

https://completemarkets.com/contentpage/131004GettingtheMostFromYourStorefront/

https://completemarkets.com/company/1stAmericanTitle-SantaFe

https://completemarkets.com/company/foxpointprograms/abstracting-services/
Most markets categorize this group as Title Agents - and often charge more for liability exposures that you don’t face. With our in-house underwriting capabilities, we offer one of the most competitively priced and comprehensive Abstractor E&O policies available in the insurance industry today. Coverage is written through an A (Excellent) rated carrier. Fox Point offers: Multiple Limit and Deductible options* Prior Acts Coverage with proof of prior coverage Defense Outside the Limits* Coverage for Foreclosure Crier services can be included Coverage for Substitute Trustee services can be included* Coverage for Notary services can be included* Coverage in all 50 states* *Certain restrictions may apply Applications Title Abstractors Application

https://completemarkets.com/Article/article-post/1548/OCCUPATIONAL-EXPOSURE-TO-FORMALDEHYDE/
Occupational Exposure To Formaldehyde
INFORMATION DATE 19920216 DESCRIPTION USDOL Program Highlights-OSHA's Final Rule on Formaldehyde TOPIC Formaldehyde SUBJECT Occupational Exposure to Formaldehyde ABSTRACT Formaldehyde is one of the most common chemicals in use today. As a chemical building block, its use can be traced to consumer goods through a wide spectrum of manufacturing processes. The use of formaldehyde as a preservative in medical laboratories and as an embalming agent in mortuaries is generally known. Formaldehyde is primarily used in the manufacture of urea, phenol, and melamine resins and for a variety of special industrial chemicals. The downstream use of formaldehyde-based inputs is found throughout the U.S. economy. It contributes to the production of about 8 percent of the gross national product (GNP) of the United States. U.S. Department of Labor Program Highlights Fact Sheet No. OSHA 92-27 OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO FORMALDEHYDE Formaldehyde is one of the most common chemicals in use today. As a chemical building block, its use can be traced to consumer goods through a wide spectrum of manufacturing processes. The use of formaldehyde as a preservative in medical laboratories and as an embalming agent in mortuaries is generally known. Formaldehyde is primarily used in the manufacture of urea, phenol, and melamine resins and for a variety of special industrial chemicals. The downstream use of formaldehyde-based inputs is found throughout the U.S. economy. It contributes to the production of about 8 percent of the gross national product (GNP) of the United States. HEALTH EFFECTS Studies indicate that formaldehyde is a potential human carcinogen. Airborne concentrations above 0.1 ppm (per million parts of air) can cause irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat. The severity of irritation increases as concentrations increase; at 100 ppm it is immediately dangerous to life and health. Dermal contact causes various skin reactions including sensitization, which might force persons thus sensitized to find other work. THE STANDARD To protect workers exposed to formaldehyde, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard (29 CFR 1910.1048) applies to formaldehyde gas, its solutions, and a variety of material such as trioxane, paraformaldehyde, and resin formulations, and solids and mixtures containing formaldehyde that serve as sources of the substance. In addition to setting permissible exposure levels, exposure monitoring and training, the standard requires medical surveillance and medical removal, recordkeeping, regulated areas, hazard communication, emergency procedures, primary reliance on engineering and work practices to control exposure, and maintenance and selection of personal protective equipment. PERMISSIBLE EXPOSURE LIMIT The permissible exposure limit (PEL) for formaldehyde in all workplaces (including general industry, construction, and maritime, but not in agriculture) covered by the OSHA Act is 0.75 ppm measured as an 8-hour time weighted average (TWA). The standard includes a 2 ppm short-term exposure limit (STEL) (i.e., maximum exposure allowed during a 15-minute period). The 'action level' is 0.5 ppm measured more than eight hours. EXPOSURE MONITORING The standard requires that the employer conduct initial monitoring to identify all employees who are exposed to formaldehyde at or above the action level or STEL and to accurately determine the exposure of each employee so identified. If the exposure level is maintained below the STEL and the action level, employers may discontinue exposure monitoring, until such time as there is a change which could affect exposure levels. The employer must also monitor employee exposure promptly, upon receiving reports of formaldehyde-related signs and symptoms. MEDICAL REMOVAL PROTECTION Medical removal protection provisions are included for employees suffering significant adverse effects from formaldehyde exposure. This provision requires that such employees be removed to jobs with less exposure until their condition improves, or until a physician determines that they will not ever be able to return to any workplace formaldehyde exposure, or for a period of six months, whichever occurs first. ENGINEERING AND WORK PRACTICE CONTROLS The employer must institute engineering and work practice controls to reduce and maintain employee exposure to formaldehyde at or below the TWA and the STEL. Whenever the employer has established that feasible engineering and work practice controls cannot reduce employee exposure to or below the PEL, the employer must apply these controls to reduce employee exposure to the extent feasible and must supplement them with respirators that satisfy this standard. LABELING Specific hazard labeling requirements are needed for all forms of formaldehyde, including mixtures and solutions, composed of 0.1 percent or greater formaldehyde, and for materials capable of releasing formaldehyde in excess of 0.1 ppm. Hazard labeling, including a warning that formaldehyde presents a potential cancer hazard, is required where formaldehyde levels, under reasonably foreseeable conditions of use, may potentially exceed 0.5 ppm. TRAINING Training is required at least annually for all employees exposed to formaldehyde concentrations of 0.1 ppm or greater. The training will increase employees' awareness of specific hazards in their workplace and of the control measures employed. The training also will assist successful medical surveillance and medical removal programs. These provisions will only be effective if employees know what signs or symptoms are related to the health effects of formaldehyde, if they know how to report them to the employer properly, and if they are periodically encouraged to do so. AFFECTED ESTABLISHMENTS AND EMPLOYEES OSHA estimates that the total number of firms using formaldehyde is 112,066; employees exposed total 2,156,801. The estimated number of workers grouped according to worker exposure levels is: 83,818 employees exposed between 0.75 ppm and 1.0 ppm, mainly in apparel (58,831), furniture (11,612) and foundries (6,085). 122,554 employees exposed between 0.5 ppm and 0.75 ppm, mainly in apparel (58,831), textile finishing (19,125), furniture 12,643), laboratories (12,220) and foundries (10,594). 1,950,429 employees exposed between 0.1 ppm and 0.5 ppm, certainly in apparel (823,637), furniture (235,095), papermills (100,100) and plastic molding (90,000). EFFECTIVE DATES Respiratory protection required to meet the PEL of 0.75 ppm must be provided; engineering and work practice controls and medical-removal protection should now also be operating. The labeling provisions should have been implemented at the end of 1992. Labeling of containers of formaldehyde products must continue to comply with the provisions of OSHA's hazard communication standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) until that time. Periodic training for all employees exposed to formaldehyde between 0.1 ppm and 0.5 ppm is also required. BENEFITS OSHA has estimated that compliance with the reduction of the PEL from 1 ppm (as an eight-hour TWA) to .75 ppm in the standard will result in the avoidance of up to three additional cases of formaldehyde-induced cancer annually. In addition, OSHA estimates that of the 2.1 million workers exposed to formaldehyde, one percent, or 21,568, may be removed annually from respiratory distress as a result of the provisions for medical removal. This is one of a series of fact sheets highlighting U.S. Department of Labor programs. It is intended as a general description only and does not carry the force of legal opinion.

https://completemarkets.com/Article/article-post/1572/SETTING-OCCUPATIONAL-SAFETY-AND-HEALTH-STANDARDS/
Setting Occupational Safety And Health Standards
INFORMATION DATE 19920218 DESCRIPTION USDOL Program Highlights, Setting Occupational Safety and Health Standards TOPIC Setting Standards SUBJECT Setting Occupational Safety and Health Standards ABSTRACT The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 authorizes the Secretary of Labor through OSHA to set mandatory occupational safety and health standards applicable to businesses affecting interstate commerce through public rulemaking. An overview is provided of the safety and health standard setting process. U.S. Department of Labor Program Highlights Fact Sheet No. OSHA 92-14 SETTING OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 authorizes the Secretary of Labor through the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 'to set mandatory occupational safety and health standards applicable to businesses affecting interstate commerce' through public rulemaking. OSHA safety standards are designed to reduce on-the-job injuries; health standards to limit workers' risk of developing occupational disease. Most OSHA standards are horizontal-they cover hazards which exist in a wide variety of industries. These are compiled as the OSHA General Industry Standards. Vertical standards apply solely to one industry. OSHA has promulgated vertical standards for the construction, agriculture, and maritime sectors. Some general industry standards apply to construction, agriculture, and maritime as well. Getting Started. The impetus to develop a new safety or health standard can come from a variety of sources: OSHA's own initiative; the U.S. Congress; information from the Department of Health and Human Services' National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH); Environmental Protection Agency's Toxic Substances Control Act (TOSCA) referral; public petitions; or requests from OSHA advisory committees. Standard Setting Process. Standard setting may begin with publication in the Federal Register of a request for information (RFI), an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM), or a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). Through an RFI or an ANPRM, OSHA seeks information to determine the extent of a particular hazard(s), currently used and potential protective measures, and costs and benefits of various protective strategies. OSHA has also sought to begin work on new standards by developing consensus through negotiated rulemaking. The agency forms an advisory committee representing the interest groups affected including industry and labor, which meets to hammer out an agreement serving as the basis for a proposed rule. The process is intended to shorten the rulemaking timetable and discourage legal challenges to the final standard while at the same time providing for full public comment on the issue. Information gathered in any of these ways and/or other available information such as injury and fatality data is used to develop a proposal. Sometimes OSHA circulates early drafts of proposals for informal comment from affected interest groups. Formal proposals are published in the Federal Register with a public comment period usually over the next 60 to 90 days which occasionally may be extended at the request of interested parties. Commentors may also request a public hearing on a proposal. Public hearings are presided over by a Department of Labor administrative law judge who certifies the record after all data are received , though decisions affecting the final standard are made by OSHA as the agent of the Secretary of Labor. Hearings are followed by post-hearing comment periods-usually 30 or more days. OSHA uses all of this information to prepare and publish in the Federal Register a final standard or a determination that no standard is needed. Standards take effect in 90 days or less, although some provisions such as requirements for detailed programs or engineering controls may be phased in over a longer period. OSHA final standards may be challenged in the appropriate U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals by adversely affected parties. Special Requirements for Health Standards. Based on Supreme Court decisions and a Presidential Executive Order, OSHA follows a four-step process for developing occupational health standards. First, the agency must demonstrate that a particular hazard poses a significant risk to worker health. Second, the agency must show that an OSHA standard would eliminate or substantially reduce that risk. Then the agency selects the most protective exposure limit that is economically and technologically feasible. Finally, the agency looks for the most cost-effective ways for employers to meet the exposure limit. Standards Priorities. The Department of Labor publishes in the Federal Register a semiannual agenda of the standards being actively worked on, including target dates. The agenda usually appears in April and October and covers regulatory activity anticipated for a one-year period. Special Standards. During its first two years, OSHA was authorized by the act to promulgate national consensus standards and other federal standards as OSHA standards. Where standards differed, the Act required OSHA to choose the most protective. National consensus standards came from voluntary standards developed by such groups as the American National Standards Institute and the National Fire Protection Association. Many OSHA safety standards were adopted in this way. Safety and health standards were adopted from the Walsh-Healey Act standards. OSHA also has the authority to promulgate emergency temporary standards when it determines that workers are exposed to 'grave danger' from toxic substances or physical conditions and could be protected by an OSHA standard. During the six-month life of an emergency temporary standard, OSHA is charged with developing a permanent standard to protect employees. The emergency temporary standard remains in effect until superseded by a permanent standard. State Standards. States are encouraged to establish and maintain their own job safety and health programs subject to Federal approval. State-plan states' standards must be 'at least as effective' as the federal standards, with comparable state standards to be issued within six months after new OSHA standards are published in the Federal Register. States also can develop standards covering areas or issues not regulated by federal OSHA. These state standards, when applicable to products distributed or used in interstate commerce, must be 'required by compelling local conditions' and not 'unduly burden interstate commerce.' Variances. The Act also provides, through the 'variance' procedure, an alternative to compliance with specific requirements of an OSHA standard. A permanent variance may be granted to an applicant (employer) who can demonstrate to OSHA's satisfaction that the proposed alternative (condition, method, practice, or the like) will provide an employee environment as safe and healthful as that which would be afforded by compliance with the standard. The Agency may also grant a temporary variance to an applicant who can demonstrate to OSHA that additional time will be needed to comply with a newly promulgated standard beyond the effective date. Keeping Track of OSHA Standards. Notices of OSHA standard-setting activities are published in the Federal Register. All OSHA standards are available in the 29 Code of Federal Regulation as well as on a compact disc with read-only memory (CD-ROM) for paying subscribers. Standards interpretations, directives, documents, the OSHA Field Operations Manual, chemical sampling information, the OSHA Technical Manual, Federal Register index, hazard information bulletins, congressional testimony, memoranda of understanding with other agencies, corporate-wide settlement agreements, library catalog, and other program information maintained on the OSHA Computerized Information System (OCIS) also are on the disc. The subscription is $88.00 for the service with three quarterly updates. A single disc is available for $28.00. Visa or MasterCard number along with expiration date or a check made payable to Superintendent of Documents may be used to order the service (order number 729-013-00000-5). The disc may be ordered from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office (GPO), Washington, D.C. 20402-9352; telephone (202) 512-0000; or purchased from a local GPO Bookstore. See the government listing in the telephone directory for GPO's local address. This is one of a series of fact sheets highlighting U.S. Department of Labor programs. It is intended as a general description only and does not carry the force of legal opinion.